What body system does leukemia affect

what body system does leukemia affect

How Does Leukemia Affect the Body?

The leukemia cells can now affect numerous other organs and organ systems of the body. Though leukemia can eventually affect various organs and organ systems, this disease begins by affecting the bone marrow, blood, and essentially the entire circulatory system. Leukemia is a type of cancer that affects the body’s blood-forming cells in the bone marrow and lymphatic system. It can take one of several forms and spread at different rates, but most types of leukemia disrupt the production of healthy white blood cells that are .

Leukemia refers to the abnormal cell multiplication of the bone marrow and blood. Whwt does not produce a tumor like other cancers. However, it overproduces abnormal white cells. The abnormal cells are cancerous, called leukemic cells, and are unable to fight infections just like the natural white cells. They also interfere with the what is the difference between hormones and pheromones of other types of blood cells.

In the end, the level of red blood cells in the system is too low that oxygen supply to tissues and cells becomes a challenge. The blood clotting and immune system are also hampered. Leukemia causes anemia because the aaffect of red blood cells is reduced to an abnormally low level, which slows down oxygen delivery to body muscles and organs. People with anemia tend to have a pale complexion and get tired easily. Individuals with leukemia may bleed from their noses, gums or may find blood in what body system does leukemia affect or stool.

Even minor bumps may cause severe bleeding and small discolored spots referred to as petechiae may develop under the skin. Lymph nodes are tiny bean-sized structures that are composed of a cluster of lymphocytes. People with leukemia have abnormal white blood cells and the lymphocytes may collect on the lymph nodes in the groin, armpits, and throat, resulting in enlarged lymph nodes. Leukemia can affect the body in other ways, such as loss of weight and appetite, and discomfort under the left lower ribs because of the swollen spleen and abnormal collection of lymphocytes.

A feeling leukemiaa weakness all the time also characterizes the disease. Leukemic individuals may have a fever lasting weeks coupled with night sweats. How does leukemia affect the body? Are there any ways to treat leukemia? Treatments for leukemia include biological therapy, chemotherapy, stem cell transplant, targeted therapy, and supportive treatments. Generally speaking, chronic leukemia cannot be cured, but it can qffect controlled with the treatments. Chemotherapy refers to the administration of medications that kills tumorous cells such boody leukemia cells and other cancer cells.

Chemotherapy may involve vody oral pills or may be delivered through the intravenous line directly to the bloodstream. The drugs are usually a combination of various effective medicines, which kills cancer cells. The mode of administration is in cycles and rest period is between them.

The side effects of chemotherapy largely depend on the drugs and the regimen. However, some common symptoms of people on chemotherapy include nausea, hair loss, mouth sores, vomiting, easy bruising, loss of bodt and increased risk of developing other leukema because of low immunity.

Biological therapy is how to wear a peasant top of the systeem if you have known "how does leukemia affect the body". Biological therapy is a mode of treatment using living organisms to treat leukemia. The treatments allow the immune system to recognize the abnormally multiplying cells and attack them.

Biological therapies do not have severe side effects when compared to chemical therapies. Some of the doss effects leukemiw swelling at the injection site, rash, muscle aches, headache, fever, and tiredness. Targeted zffect are drugs which disrupt the specific mechanism of the tumor cells rather ysstem eradicate the cancer cells rapidly. Targeted therapy causes less damage to normal cells when compared to chemotherapy. A targeted cancer therapy causes the target cells to cease from enlarging rather than dying, and they interfere with specific molecules how to fix bleach stains on black pants promote growth or spread of cancers.

The mode of administration of targeted therapy if the ending inventory is overstated what occurs usually injection or pill.

The side effects include bloating, swelling, a sudden weight gain, diarrhea, nausea, vomiting, rash and muscle cramps. Radiation therapy utilizes high-energy radiation which targets cancer cells. The radiation therapy is used if leukemia has spread to the brain and it can be used to target areas such as spleen where the leukemic cells have accumulated.

Radiation therapy has leuke,ia own side effects. The side effects usually depend on the location where the radiation is applied. If radiation is applied to the abdominal area, leukemja it can result in diarrhea, vomiting, and nausea.

For radiations on the skin, it may cause reddening, tenderness, and dryness of the skin. General tiredness is common during the therapy. Can you treat it with stem cell transplant? This type of therapy refers to administration of high radiation or chemotherapy to leikemia cancerous cells in the bone marrow.

Thereafter, transplanted stem cells are intravenously delivered, which will produce new blood cells. Stem leukemix may originate from the patient or from a donor. The regular treatment for leukemia deplete normal blood cells, this increases the keukemia of infections and bleeding. Supportive treatments are used to prevent complications arising from wnat cancer therapy. In addition, the supportive how to build a grappling gun are important in minimizing the side effects of radiation or medical therapy.

Supportive treatments given to patients undergoing therapy include flu vaccines, anti-nausea medications, and antibiotics among others. Copyright WWW. Last Updated 30 April, How Does Leukemia Affect the Body? Some of the effects leukemia have on the body include: 1. Anemia Leukemia causes anemia because the production of red blood cells is reduced to an abnormally low level, which slows down oxygen delivery to body muscles and organs. Easy Bruising or Bleeding Individuals with leukemia may bleed from their noses, gums or may find blood in urine or stool.

Swollen Lymph Nodes Lymph nodes are tiny bean-sized dkes that are composed of a cluster of lymphocytes. General Loss of Wellbeing Leukemia can affect the body in other ways, such as loss of weight and appetite, and discomfort under the left lower ribs because of the swollen spleen and abnormal collection of lymphocytes.

How to Treat Leukemia How does leukemia affect the body? Chemotherapy Chemotherapy refers to the administration of medications that kills tumorous cells such as leukemia cells and other cancer cells. Biological Therapy Biological therapy is one of the choices if you have known "how does leukemia affect the body".

Targeted Therapy Targeted therapies are drugs which disrupt the specific mechanism of the tumor cells rather than eradicate the cancer cells rapidly. Radiation Therapy Radiation therapy utilizes high-energy radiation which targets cancer cells. Stem Cell Transplant How sustem leukemia affect the body? Supportive Treatments The regular treatment for leukemia deplete normal blood cells, this increases the risk of infections and bleeding.

What Is Buerger's Disease?

What are the symptoms of leukemia?

Jan 05,  · Leukemia can affect the body in other ways, such as loss of weight and appetite, and discomfort under the left lower ribs because of the swollen spleen and abnormal collection of lymphocytes. A feeling of weakness all the time also characterizes the disease. Leukemic individuals may have a fever lasting weeks coupled with night sweats. Feb 15,  · Leukemia is a cancer of the blood and bone marrow. It may be initially asymptomatic, but leukemia can cause fatigue, weakness, and easy bruising and bleeding, among others. Leukemia is a cancer of the blood cells, usually the white blood cells though it can start in other types of blood cells.

Leukemia is a type of cancer that harms the body's ability to make healthy blood cells. It starts in the bone marrow, the soft center of various bones. This is where new blood cells are made. There are three main types of blood cells:.

Leukemia usually refers to cancer of the white blood cells. It tends to affect one of the two major types of white blood cells: lymphocytes and granulocytes. These cells circulate through the bloodstream and the lymph system to help the body fight off viruses, infections, and other invading organisms. Leukemia arising from cancerous lymphocytes is called lymphocytic leukemia; leukemia from cancerous granulocytes is called myeloid or myelogenous leukemia.

Leukemia is either acute comes on suddenly or chronic lasts a long time. Acute leukemia affects adults and children. Chronic leukemia rarely affects children. Leukemia is usually not inherited. It tends to happen to people without any family history of the disease. Some forms of leukemia, though, such as chronic lymphocytic leukemia, strike close relatives in the same family. In people who develop acute leukemia, immature white blood cells multiply quickly in the bone marrow.

Over time, they crowd out healthy cells. This can cause unexpected or excessive bleeding or infections. When the cancerous white blood cells reach high numbers, they can spread to other organs, causing damage. This is especially true in acute myeloid leukemia. Both acute lymphocytic leukemia and acute myeloid leukemia have many subtypes.

The treatment and prognosis may vary somewhat, depending on the subtype. Chronic leukemia is when the body produces too many blood cells that are only partially developed.

These cells often cannot function like mature blood cells. Chronic leukemia usually develops more slowly and is a less dramatic illness than acute leukemia. There are two main types of chronic leukemia:. Both chronic lymphocytic leukemia and chronic myeloid leukemia have subtypes. They also share some characteristics with other forms of leukemia. The treatment and prognosis may vary depending on the subtype.

Lymphatic and myelogenous leukemias are the most common. However, cancers of other types of bone marrow cells can develop. Megakaryocytic leukemia arises from megakaryocytes, cells that form platelets. Platelets help blood to clot. Another rare form of leukemia is erythroleukemia. It arises from cells that that form red blood cells. Like chronic and acute leukemias, rare forms of the disease can be categorized into subtypes. The subtype depends on what markers the cells carry on their surface.

Leukemia can sometimes take a while to diagnose because many of its symptoms accompany the flu and other common medical problems. Your doctor may not suspect leukemia based on your symptoms alone.

However, during your physical examination, he or she may find that you have swollen lymph nodes or an enlarged liver or spleen. Routine blood tests, especially blood cell counts, may yield abnormal results. Genetic tests can help determine exactly what type of leukemia you have. These sophisticated tests may also offer clues as to how you will respond to a particular therapy.

The treatment of leukemia aims to wipe out the cancerous white blood cells. But this usually means killing healthy white blood cells and harming the body's ability to fight infection. The treatment of acute leukemia does not depend on how far the disease has advanced but on the person's condition. Has the person just been diagnosed with the disease? Or has the disease come back after remission a period when the disease is controlled? If acute lymphocytic leukemia returns, different doses of various chemotherapy drugs are used to combat the disease.

Several years of chemotherapy may be needed to keep the leukemia in remission. Some people may receive a bone marrow transplant. With acute myeloid leukemia, treatment generally depends on the person's age and overall health. It also depends on his or her blood cell counts. As with acute lymphocytic leukemia, treatment usually begins with induction therapy in an effort to send the leukemia into remission. When leukemia cells can no longer be seen, consolidation therapy begins.

Bone marrow transplantation may also be considered in the treatment plan. Treatment for chronic lymphocytic leukemia begins with determining the extent of the cancer. This is called staging. There are five stages of chronic lymphocytic leukemia:. Treatment of chronic lymphocytic leukemia depends on the stage of the disease, as well as on the person's age and overall health.

In stage 0, treatment may not be needed, but the person's health will be monitored closely. In stage I or II, observation with close monitoring or chemotherapy is the usual treatment. Some people may need a bone marrow transplant. For chronic myeloid leukemia, drugs known as tyrosine kinase inhibitors have become standard therapy, especially for people in the early stages of the disease.

They correct the chemical defects in the cancer cells that had allowed them to grow in an uncontrollable fashion. The use of these targeted therapies has dramatically improved the prognosis for many people with chronic myeloid leukemia. Disclaimer: As a service to our readers, Harvard Health Publishing provides access to our library of archived content. Please note the date of last review or update on all articles. No content on this site, regardless of date, should ever be used as a substitute for direct medical advice from your doctor or other qualified clinician.

Leukemia Published: December, Antibiotic resistance and the dangers of superbugs The upshot of allergy treatment. Cancer Your Immune System. E-mail Address. First Name Optional.

3 thoughts on “What body system does leukemia affect”

  1. Sorry to say this I know that your being serious but up your acting like a my mom and my teacher in the same body

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